The Montrose Oktoberfest is the City of Glendale’s and the Foothills largest outdoor event as well as one of the few locations in southern California that celebrates this Bavarian tradition. Our annual Oktoberfest celebration has been a Montrose institution for 38 years and has become a local family tradition. We are one of the few Oktoberfest celebrations in Southern California and one of the largest. This is an event that the Montrose-Verdugo City Chamber of Commerce puts on not only for the community but also to bring people into the area who are not familiar with the wonderful town of Montrose. Staged in our outdoor shopping area along Honolulu Ave in Montrose, there is something for everyone in the family!:

Sponsored by the Montrose-Verdugo City Chamber of Commerce, this is a community activity and Chamber fundraiser. It is the premier family festival in the Foothill community. The emphasis in on children’s activities and family fun.

Oktoberfest Sponsorship Information

It’s Oktoberfest Time Again and your Chamber of Commerce has advertising opportunities for you! Show your support for your community and let everyone who attends the event know about your business! Check out the Oktoberfest Sponsorship possibilities. Your business name can be seen by over 30,000+ new customers. The 38th Annual Oktoberfest, Saturday, October 3rd, 2015 creates the ideal venue to promote your business name since this annual tradition draws a large captive audience from the entire Foothill community and across the San Fernando Valley.

Would you like to volunteer? That’s another great way to promote your business or group.
Download our Sponsorship Form in a PDF FORMAT
Download our Volunteer Form in a PDF FORMAT
Montrose-Verdugo City Chamber of Commerce by E-mail at mvcc@montrosechamber.org or 818-249-7171.

Oktoberfest History in the Montrose Area

In 1956, the very first Oktoberfest in California was celebrated in the Foothills area at our very own Crescenta Valley Park! Up until 1957, the German-American League, a group that promoted German culture, privately owned the west end of the park. Hindenburg Park, as it was called then, was named after Paul Von Hindenburg who was a German WWI hero and the President of Germany from the late 20’s to the early 30’s. During the ’30s, ‘40s and the ’50s the park was the held German cultural celebrations, featuring bands, plays, dances, and parades, each weekend serving German beer, wine, and German food specialties. Oktoberfest become popular in the German American community after WWII when American GI’s were coming back from Bavaria. By the early 70’s, Oktoberfest celebrations were being held all across the country.